Dental mentalism

I went to the dentists yesterday.

I love the dentists.

I am seen by student dentists in their final year at university and because of this, I a) get free treatment and b) get some of the most careful attentive care possible. Everything is double-checked by a doctor from the university dental school and ninety-nine times out of a hundred they agree with the opinions of their students.

Over the last year and a bit, I have been seen by five student dentists, *ahem!* cutting their teeth in the real world (sorry). Apparently my gnashers are beautifully clean, and amazingly, it’s rare for them to treat someone with a full set of their own 32 adult teeth. I also like to think I’m a good patient, so we get along fine (I swap stories with the nurse regarding our children). Early on in their placements the students are understandably nervous, but soften up like ageing fillings after a number of visits.

I have been treated for hereditary gum disease over my course of treatment and this is finally starting to clear up. Except for one 10 millimetre pocket next to one of my back teeth. This means that there is a void where my gums and teeth don’t connect for a whole centimetre down into my jaw.

I will have to have this pocket and the surrounding teeth deep cleaned to give the gums a chance of re-attaching and healing up. I will also have to have three small fillings. Three appointments in all should cover it.

What’s this got to do with MS? I hear you ask.

Well, most people have a local anaesthetic for deep pocket cleaning. I will request to forego this. I’ll just grit my teeth (sorry, again) and bear the pain. I know I can do it, I have done it before, albeit down to about 6 millimetres.

The reason is this: I am fed up with numbness and weird sensations. I have plenty of that to deal with on a daily basis. Also, I have developed such a high pain threshold these days, that I am prepared to endure the few minutes of sensitive sharp cold bone and nerve pain of the dentist than have a morning of slack-mouthed numbness and tingling. I may even see if there is a chance of doing the same for the fillings, but we’ll wait and see on that.

I don’t think I am being particularly “hard” or macho or anything. I think the psychology of the dentist makes you expect the pain to be worse than it actually is, in the same way that a wasp sting is in no way comparable to the panic stricken flapping and shrieking people make when one of the little creatures enters their airspace.

Don’t get me wrong, it will hurt…

…I’ll just have to grin and bear it. 🙂

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