Making lemonade #2

Way back when I started secondary school, a rumour went around that all the boys would need a medical during the first term. This would involve a procedure where a nurse would hold our testicles while we coughed.

This never happened, of course, but a part of me believed it. It made the eleven year old me unduly anxious to say the least.

I often think about how cool it would be to be some sort of guardian angel to my awkward, shy, younger self. I’d put a supportive arm around my own shoulders and whisper something into my ear… some mature advice to make me feel better: “That thing about a nurse holding your bollocks? It won’t happen. It’s utter nonsense… ha ha! Just you wait another 30 years.”

Fast forward to the other week…

I’ve learnt a new skill!

It involves passing a foot long length of tubing into the most sensitive and private part of my anatomy.

The first time I did it, I had my trousers round my ankles, while a nurse (female), who I’d met for the first time barely 20 minutes previously, looked on, rubbing my shoulder in a supportive, encouraging manner.

Yes, I have to catheterise myself at least twice a day, now, due to the fact that I retain approximately one pint (500ml) of urine in my bladder, even after visiting the loo. The urology nurse who came to visit told me that anyone who regularly holds 400ml of urine is advised to catheterise (the MS Trust say anyone holding more than 100ml), so I fall (un)comfortably into that bracket.

I’ll be performing this procedure for approximately… hmmm… how many months? Oh wait!… The rest of my bloody life!

I’ll be honest with you. The first few days you try it, it isn’t easy to do. I winced each time at the prospect of threading the tube into such a seemingly tight space. I also had to change the type of catheters I was using as the initial bendy latex ones were causing too much pain and I was finding blood in my urine. Plus I found them as easy to hold as a live eel. But two weeks on, with stiffer, differently lubricated catheters, it’s a lot better, and I feel a lot calmer doing it.

So has it worked? Do I visit the loo less urgently? Do I go less often? Do I finally have an unbroken night’s sleep?

The answer to that is yes and no.

I can’t describe how crestfallen I felt on the first night. After painfully tubing myself before going to bed, I woke up at 2am, 4am, and then 6am desperate for the loo. It was as if nothing had changed. Nothing except for the fact that I now had to perform some sort of low level surgery on myself.

After a few nights of this, a phonecall to my MS nurse and a visit to the GP meant that I’ve started taking solifenacin tablets to relax the bladder muscle and reduce the urge to pass water.

It’s early days still, but I mostly wake up with my bladder just once a night now (and I catheterise when I do). During the working day I might make a trip to the loo, two or even three times in my six hour shift, instead of three times an hour, so to me, it’s an unbelievable turnaround. In the daytime I couldn’t be happier. I’m getting to be friends with my bladder again and it turns out he’s quite a nice guy.

There’s still the element of waking halfway through the night to contend with, though. I wonder if part of it is to do with learned behaviour. Perhaps my body automatically wakes up at regular points during the night and now needs to be retrained. I’ve tried to combat the night time loo visits by cutting down massively on the amount of caffeine I take in and the drink of water I have with my evening meal is often the last liquid to pass my lips every day.

It’s early days on the pills, though. Tomorrow marks one week of taking them and the GP told me it takes about seven days for them to kick in (the MS Trust says up to four weeks), so we’ll see how it goes. I don’t remember the last time I managed to sleep through the night without waking. The day I finally do, I’ll be partying.

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7 thoughts on “Making lemonade #2

  1. that’s such a massive change in your life and I’m really pleased to hear that it’s looking promising. I can hardly imagine having to thread that tube up myself… although, isn’t it funny what you get used to? I never used to imagine that I’d stick a huge needle into my leg once a week either :-\
    Hats off to your matter-of-factness and stoicism, anyway…. it’s what we MS-ers learn to do, eh?

  2. Glad the initial learning part is over It’ll get easier. Watch for infections. Urologist helped me experiment with antibiotics and it works for me to take one every other day.

  3. Congratulations on cathing!! It is difficult at first, but it really is an easier option than wearing a bag all of the time. Hopefully, you’ll find this effort less annoying than running to the bathroom every hour on the hour! Good luck and hang in there…you can do it!

    • Thanks for the comments. You’re quite right, as I was walking into work this morning I was thinking to myself how you couldn’t get me back to the situation I was in before. I find myself looking forward to the relief cathing brings now and I’ve probably been to the loo at work once all day.

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