#Cycle100forMS

So I’m raising money for the MS Society and I’m doing it by cycling 100 miles. The challenge finishes at the end of this month (August 2020), by which time I hope to have raised a nice sum of money and will have become a little fitter by doing so.

“But Dave…” I hear you say, “you can’t ride a bike for toffee. You have no balance, and isn’t 100 miles pretty far to ride, particularly when you have MS and it’s the middle of summer? You’ll burn out!”

Well, thank you for pointing this out. I’ve actually adapted the challenge to fit my abilities, so instead of a regular bike, my wife found a second hand spinning bike from a local gym (it was the wrong colour, apparently), and I’m breaking up the challenge by cycling part of the distance every night. I’ve wanted some form of exercise bike for a while and I’m not a gym person by any stretch of the imagination, so having one in the garage is ideal for me and I’m down there most nights.

“But how can you travel 100 miles?”

Well I ‘cycle’ for half an hour a day in the late evening when it’s nice and cool and then I add up the daily distances that the bike clocks up on its odometer, and so long as I hit the target by the end of this month I’ve achieved my goal. As it turns out I hit the 100 miles at the end of last month, so I’m already there.

“Isn’t that a bit like cheating? Surely you should travel 100 miles in one go.”

Well I’m not a professional cyclist, or athlete. It’s more of a challenge for me to go out and cycle for half an hour every night on a bike that I set some resistance on, than it would be for Lance Armstrong, say, to go out and cycle 100 miles in one go.

“So how much money do you hope to raise?”

Well, that’s another target well and truly smashed. When I started out I thought a couple of hundred quid would be a good amount, but I’ve raised nearly £1,100 now.

“That’s brilliant! So what do you get out of the fundraising personally, and do you have any tips for anyone hoping to do the same?”

I made sure I targeted social media in such a way as to capture the broadest sweep of family and friends – Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Facebook was the most responsive, even though I’m not on it much. My wife and one or two friends shared my updates and she has loads of family and friends and so forth, so it was nice to connect with people that way. I’d say posting updates when people are winding down on a Friday afternoon is the ideal time, particularly during the coronavirus situation when everyone’s staying at home more.

Apart from that, I sent an email around at work, and I picked up a few extra quid from casually dropping the subject into conversations. I’d say posting updates was key so people who have already donated feel like their investment has paid off, and also so that people who have made a mental note to sponsor me at some point are given a gentle nudge.

So far, about 60 people have sponsored me and it’s genuinely heart-warming when you find out another donation has dropped. You also find out that more people than you realise have some sort of connection with MS. If they don’t have it themselves, then someone close to them will, so it’s been a way for people to make a concession to the struggles their friends and loved-ones go through.

I’d say, if you’re thinking of doing some charity fundraising – do it. Make sure you have a real connection to the charity and each and every donation, no matter the amount, will give you a warm glow.

“I know you, Dave, and I bet you listen to Kraftwerk while you cycle. Tour de France, yeah?”

At least three people have made this point, so this is a genuine ‘frequently asked question’. The answer to that is I tried it once for a giggle but I didn’t flow with the tempo of ‘Tour de France Soundtracks’ – the album was a bit slow for me.

I started my challenge listening to podcasts but this made the cycling drag a bit, so I now listen to music. The ideal album for me to cycle to is Pink Flag by Wire as I know it like the back of my hand (it’s a favourite) and the tracks are short and fast and the whole thing just about fills my 30 minutes. The time flies!

“Great! So how do I donate?”

Well, thanks for asking. It’s really easy as I’ve set up a JustGiving page so you can read more about why I’m fundraising for the MS Society in particular, with some examples of how the money might be used, and you can make a donation by card or by PayPal. The cash goes straight to the MS Society and you can even donate anonymously if you want to. Just remember to do so by the end of August 2020 and thank you, it really means a lot to me. I’m doing victory laps now.

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