Back to square one

Just like the election of a pope, or the announcement of the winner in some Saturday prime time family entertainment bollocks, I expect you’re all on tenterhooks wondering which disease modifying medication I’m going to plump for.

I don’t know 100%, but here’s my quick notes so far (apologies for superficiality):

Beta Interferon (Rebif, Avonex, Betaferon, etc)

– It’s a no for this as I’ve just given it up after six years. It made me extremely depressed – see Beta Interferon Blues.

Glatiramer Acetate (Copaxone)

– a big possibility. The only things against it are the injection site reactions and the daily injections.

Teriflunomide (Aubagio)

– no greater relapse reduction than copaxone, I think, but with a few extra side effects such as hair loss, gastric nastiness etc

Fingolimod (Gilenya)

– a risk of some heart problems, including arhythmia and in extreme cases cardiac arrest. Also a risk of macular oedema in the eyes. It’s a no to this as I’d rather eliminate the risk completely.

Alemtuzumab (Lemtrada)

– It’s a no to this as it can make you vulnerable to infection. I am married to a teacher and I have two primary school age children. I also spend a lot of time with my hands in the earth on my allotment. I’m exposed to a lot of infections. Also there could be blood clotting and thyroid issues. Once you have the infusion, there’s no going back – it’s not like you can stop taking it.

Natalizumab (Tysabri)

– The brain disease PML is documented among Tysabri users, but thankfully extremely rare. I think I would only be eligible for this if I had extremely active MS anyway. I don’t fancy having infusions every four weeks – they’re not something I can do quickly and easily in the comfort of my own home.

Dimethyl Fumarate (Tecfidera)

– this is my number one choice. In trials it has reduced relapse rates by something like 45-50% and is delivered twice daily in tablet form. There are gastric side effects – nausea, diarhoea etc, but I’ve done my homework and there are coping strategies and the nastiness should wear off over time. Worth a try, I thought. There’s one little drawback: it hasn’t been approved by NICE yet, so isn’t available to NHS patients at the moment. A decision is due in August according to the NICE website.

So there you go… I have more reading to do, but at the moment, it’s Dimethyl Fumarate first, and if that doesn’t work out Glatiramer Acetate is the fall-back.

I had a wobbly moment while talking to my better half last night (lost my balance slightly as I turned round). I think she’s worried that I’m not on any meds at the moment, but I think I would’ve done that anyway. I guess whatever medication I choose doesn’t guarantee a long term improvement in conditions.

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