Making lemonade #2

Way back when I started secondary school, a rumour went around that all the boys would need a medical during the first term. This would involve a procedure where a nurse would hold our testicles while we coughed.

This never happened, of course, but a part of me believed it. It made the eleven year old me unduly anxious to say the least.

I often think about how cool it would be to be some sort of guardian angel to my awkward, shy, younger self. I’d put a supportive arm around my own shoulders and whisper something into my ear… some mature advice to make me feel better: “That thing about a nurse holding your bollocks? It won’t happen. It’s utter nonsense… ha ha! Just you wait another 30 years.”

Fast forward to the other week…

I’ve learnt a new skill!

It involves passing a foot long length of tubing into the most sensitive and private part of my anatomy.

The first time I did it, I had my trousers round my ankles, while a nurse (female), who I’d met for the first time barely 20 minutes previously, looked on, rubbing my shoulder in a supportive, encouraging manner.

Yes, I have to catheterise myself at least twice a day, now, due to the fact that I retain approximately one pint (500ml) of urine in my bladder, even after visiting the loo. The urology nurse who came to visit told me that anyone who regularly holds 400ml of urine is advised to catheterise (the MS Trust say anyone holding more than 100ml), so I fall (un)comfortably into that bracket.

I’ll be performing this procedure for approximately… hmmm… how many months? Oh wait!… The rest of my bloody life!

I’ll be honest with you. The first few days you try it, it isn’t easy to do. I winced each time at the prospect of threading the tube into such a seemingly tight space. I also had to change the type of catheters I was using as the initial bendy latex ones were causing too much pain and I was finding blood in my urine. Plus I found them as easy to hold as a live eel. But two weeks on, with stiffer, differently lubricated catheters, it’s a lot better, and I feel a lot calmer doing it.

So has it worked? Do I visit the loo less urgently? Do I go less often? Do I finally have an unbroken night’s sleep?

The answer to that is yes and no.

I can’t describe how crestfallen I felt on the first night. After painfully tubing myself before going to bed, I woke up at 2am, 4am, and then 6am desperate for the loo. It was as if nothing had changed. Nothing except for the fact that I now had to perform some sort of low level surgery on myself.

After a few nights of this, a phonecall to my MS nurse and a visit to the GP meant that I’ve started taking solifenacin tablets to relax the bladder muscle and reduce the urge to pass water.

It’s early days still, but I mostly wake up with my bladder just once a night now (and I catheterise when I do). During the working day I might make a trip to the loo, two or even three times in my six hour shift, instead of three times an hour, so to me, it’s an unbelievable turnaround. In the daytime I couldn’t be happier. I’m getting to be friends with my bladder again and it turns out he’s quite a nice guy.

There’s still the element of waking halfway through the night to contend with, though. I wonder if part of it is to do with learned behaviour. Perhaps my body automatically wakes up at regular points during the night and now needs to be retrained. I’ve tried to combat the night time loo visits by cutting down massively on the amount of caffeine I take in and the drink of water I have with my evening meal is often the last liquid to pass my lips every day.

It’s early days on the pills, though. Tomorrow marks one week of taking them and the GP told me it takes about seven days for them to kick in (the MS Trust says up to four weeks), so we’ll see how it goes. I don’t remember the last time I managed to sleep through the night without waking. The day I finally do, I’ll be partying.

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Relapse

Just thought I’d let y’all know that I had a relapse in the last couple of months.

It mainly involved vertigo and dizziness, so I spent a good couple of weeks crashing into things, nearly falling over, feeling nauseous and actually vomiting a few times. It also involved some fatigue, L’Hermitte’s and a not unpleasant hot sensation near my right ankle.

GP reckoned it was labyrinthitis to start with, so he gave me some drugs for that, to see if they worked even though my MS history has been peppered by vertigo. They didn’t, of course, so instead of going back to him, I went to my neurologist. One Dix-Hallpike manouevre later to eliminate BPPV and my first relapse for three years was confirmed.

I was prescribed steroids, but I didn’t take them in the end as I felt I was getting better and I didn’t fancy a week of the side effects.

Thinking about my GP, I asked my neuro about the possibility of an ear infection…

“Can you hear that?” rubbing his finger tips together next to my right ear.

“Yes.”

“And that?” next to my left ear, this time.

“Yes.”

“Do your ears hurt?”

“No.”

“Then it’s not an ear infection.”

So there you go. It was inflammation of the balance centres in the brain stem apparently. I’m very much better than I was, though I did have a funny turn yesterday so I reckon it’s there in the background somewhere.

MS Trust open door

open door is the quarterly newsletter from the MS Trust. It largely reports on research results and the like, but despite this, is very readable. The current issue (just arrived) deals with posture, depression, misleading stem cell treatments and the impact of progressive MS on family life amongst other things.

Items that caught my eye:

Prevalence of MS in the UK may be as great as 100,000 people, not 85,000 as previously thought. The figure was arrived at after studying codes indicating an

MS diagnosis from GP records. Considering the fact that I consulted my GPs with vertigo and optic neuritis symptoms in the four years leading up to diagnosis, without mention of MS, this rings true.

Oral treatments for relapsing/remitting MS take a step closer with the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) announcing that fingolimod and cladribine will be included in their next round of appraisals. Both of these drugs have shown positive results in trials so far, but some safety issues need further research. I don’t think I need to say that I would welcome disease modifying therapy in tablet form, do I? The thrice weekly ritual of warming up syringes and choosing injection sites is a real bind. I don’t know what side-effects are associated with these drugs.

MS patients sweat markedly less than people without MS. I would guess that this isn’t the case with all people with MS, just as not everyone has the same line-up of symptoms. Heat aggravates MS symptoms, so I also guess that a sweating impairment could begin a vicious circle of overheating.

If you are living in the UK, you can sign up to receive open door on the MS Trust website: www.mstrust.org.uk

The eyes (will) have it

I have been waiting for two months for the letter deferring me to my local hospital eye dept. (I need glasses to correct my doublevision). I chased my neurologist up over the phone today.

My Uber-Neurologist’s secretary apologised on behalf of the consultant (previously referred to as Dr Somebodyorother) who saw me, explaining that they had a reputation for being “a bit slow.”

What a strange thing to admit…

…but actually quite a breath of fresh air.

My case notes are going to be passed onto my neurologist proper (Dr Sh) who should be requesting an appointment be made via my GP.

It all sounds very convoluted but at least things seem to be on the move.

One year on …

Today is the first anniversary of my diagnosis (see MS History – part two).

Health professional bodycount so far.

Starting with the first GP visit last year, the bodycount is as follows

  • GPs 4
  • Practice Nurses 2
  • MS nurse 1
  • Ward nurse 1
  • Occupational Health nurse 1
  • Phlebotomists 6 (estimate)
  • Physiotherapists 1
  • Neurologists 5
  • Neuro-psychologists 2
  • Radiologists 4

If you consider the medication as well, I have probably cost the NHS more money over the last year than some of it’s employees.

Symptom recap:

Current symptoms:

  • mild optic neuritis (since Jan ’09)
  • doublevision / nystagmus / intra-nuclear opthalmoplegia / oscillopsia
  • fatigue
  • tingling / pins and needles
  • neuropathic pain in legs

Symtoms that have cleared up for now:

  • L’Hermitte’s sign
  • vertigo
  • muscle weakness
  • involuntary muscle movement

Of the current symptoms, the fatigue and optic neuritis aren’t quite as acute as they were at first onset, so I feel much better, relatively, than I did last year. I think it is important to stress that I still have bad days, though (I nearly fell asleep in a meeting yesterday). Things are also helped by friendlier medication.

MS Awareness week – Limboland haiku sequence

Hello all

It is Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Awareness Week across the globe. To mark this, I have written the following haiku sequence.

Regular readers will know that I was diagnosed with Relapsing Remitting MS in 2008. Limboland was inspired by the journey to diagnosis.

Limboland

no hint of a smile –
for once my doctor says
“take it easy”

on the scan room ceiling
cherry blossom –
the staff retreat behind glass

not crying yet …
your chin dimples
as you talk

diagnosis
I salute the magpie
anyway

on the news a terror attack …
my leg
numb again

from a packed lift
a man on crutches
follows me to clinic

new year’s eve
the bowl slips from my fingers…
smashes

Just a note on the cherry blossom haiku. Diagnosis of MS requires an MRI scan, but to eliminate other possible ailments including brain tumours an initial CT Scan is performed. This was described to me as being like sticking your head in a giant washing machine and I reckon that’s a pretty good description.

I don’t know if there is anything similar in other hospitals but at the Royal Hallamshire in Sheffield they have a light box on the ceiling of the scan room with an image of cherry blossom on it. I presume this is to calm the nerves while your head is x-rayed. Cherry blossom is an image often used in haiku, it normally signifies spring which in turn can also imply beginnings.

Limboland is also appearing somewhere on the MS Society website http://www.mssociety.org.uk/ and on my personal haiku blog: http://distantlightning.blogspot.com/

http://www.mstrust.org.uk/msawareness/
http://www.mssociety.org.uk/get_involved/campaigning/ms_week_2009.html

Drug experiments

It’s official, I have been told by my GP that I can experiment with drugs.

Well, actually, no. I have been given the go ahead to increase the dosage of the amitriptyline to try and weigh up the pros of pain relief and the cons of the drowsy side-effects.

The side-effects are something I have yet to experience, or if I have, they have become lost in my general background dopeyness.

The pros are that the pain I had been experiencing seems to have abated slightly – occuring later or only if I have had a strenuous day. Not a daily occurence like before. And if I forget to take my tablets for a day or two (like the night before last) I start to get a bit fuzzier round the edges, the shooting pain will start in my fingertips and the squeezing sensation will start in my calves.

Starting last night, I doubled the dosage.

The difficulty is – if it seems to work, is it the drugs doing the work, or is it the crazy unpredictable roller-coaster of MS giving me some time off before it turns on me with a snarl?

It is around this time of year that I have experienced my most debilitating relapses. Hopefully this year, the terrorist cell lurking in my body will notice the beta interferon in my system and decide it isn’t worth the bother. This year, I will also be on the look-out, so I should be able to get some treatment when I need it.