It’s been a while..

I knew I hadn’t updated this blog for ages but I didn’t realise the last time I had anything to say was September 2015.

I’ve been busy caring for an elderly relative (now in residential care) and editing a poetry journal (now resigned), so I’ve either been exhausted or lacking the will and free time to exert myself with anything less pressing unfortunately.

My MS could also be described, to nick Viv Stanshall’s genius description of Rawlinson End, as ‘changing, yet changeless as canal water’, so it might be a year or two before I realise that anything has changed significantly enough to report on.

So what’s new? Three things mainly…

Firstly, I had a relapse involving optic neuritis about a year ago which kicked me into safe mode for a few weeks and I took some time off work. It’s a symptom that hasn’t really bothered me much for over ten years so for it to kick in was a bit of a shock (and painful to start with). All better now apart from a bit of noise in my vision.

Secondly, I’ve lost a stone in weight. I asked my GP to refer me to my local council-run sports centre a while back to try and get myself in shape. I didn’t have the time to do that, though, as already described, so I just put myself on a strict diet of my own devising. This seems to have worked. I’ve also recently taken to waking up at 5am to go for a run round my local neighbourhood (just a couple of miles each time). It’s a good time of year to do this as you have to keep moving to avoid freezing solid. The only other people around at 5am are milkmen, gritter drivers and people who either commute long distances or care about their careers too much, scraping the ice off their windscreens.

Thirdly, I was referred to my big city hospital’s urology department to sort my rapidly deteriorating bladder problems which were a massive drain (‘scuse the pun) on my quality of life.

I’ll cover the last two points in forthcoming posts – bet you can’t wait.

Until then…

Hindsight

My first big relapse was in 2004 with a numb face, a headache that wouldn’t shift, optic neuritis and vertigo.

It’s strange to think of it now, but the medical profession couldn’t explain the cause at the time. Probably because I presented the symptoms individually, rather than all in one go.

I then experienced a few more symptoms in the following few years that tied in with the diagnosis of my MS in 2008. This was when I had the mother of all relapses that left me with the doublevision I have today.

Because of the missed diagnosis, I’ve often wondered when the start of my MS really was. Until recently I believed it was 2004.

Now I’m not so sure I can put a date on it.

In the late eighties, for instance, I had some very dodgy visual symptoms that tie in with optic neuritis and Uhthoff’s phenomena as they followed midsummer cross country runs.

Then I remember there’s a bit of a gap between 1987 and 2004. Seventeen years with no symptoms at all…

…but last night I found some evidence to the contrary.

If you ask my wife, she’ll verify that I’m a bit of a hoarder (I prefer the term self-archivist). I was sorting through some old papers in my loft last night. Among them were some old pay slips, timesheets and sickness forms from when I lived in London. It was in the sickness forms that I discovered a referral to my then occupational health department in 1998.

The reason? Doublevision!

This, of course, is the very symptom that returned ten years later to make me seek serious medical advice.

Not just doublevision though, eye pain too, which sounds like a dash of optic neuritis thrown in to me.

I only have vague memories of all this, as this happened fifteen years ago. I seem to remember a workplace assessment giving the reason as eye strain, which explains why I didn’t pursue the 2004 wierdness when that’s how it was explained to me again.

It does lend some creedence to the idea that my MS is a lot older than I, or my doctors realise. It effectively expands the timeline by six years.

My mission, now, is to find further evidence. To see if I can fill in the gaps between 1987 and 1998. I kept a diary on and off in the late eighties and early nineties, and I have a box of old letters, so I’ll be interested to see if that brings anything to light.

I have a few unexplained medical issues that are still a bit vague in my memory from that time, so I suspect it might provide a few enlightnening memories.

It won’t change anything, of course. It won’t change my current situation and it won’t inform my treatment. One thing it will do though, is satisfy my curiosity.

It will have contributed largely to the person I am today.

Relapse

Just thought I’d let y’all know that I had a relapse in the last couple of months.

It mainly involved vertigo and dizziness, so I spent a good couple of weeks crashing into things, nearly falling over, feeling nauseous and actually vomiting a few times. It also involved some fatigue, L’Hermitte’s and a not unpleasant hot sensation near my right ankle.

GP reckoned it was labyrinthitis to start with, so he gave me some drugs for that, to see if they worked even though my MS history has been peppered by vertigo. They didn’t, of course, so instead of going back to him, I went to my neurologist. One Dix-Hallpike manouevre later to eliminate BPPV and my first relapse for three years was confirmed.

I was prescribed steroids, but I didn’t take them in the end as I felt I was getting better and I didn’t fancy a week of the side effects.

Thinking about my GP, I asked my neuro about the possibility of an ear infection…

“Can you hear that?” rubbing his finger tips together next to my right ear.

“Yes.”

“And that?” next to my left ear, this time.

“Yes.”

“Do your ears hurt?”

“No.”

“Then it’s not an ear infection.”

So there you go. It was inflammation of the balance centres in the brain stem apparently. I’m very much better than I was, though I did have a funny turn yesterday so I reckon it’s there in the background somewhere.

Mild relapse?

I have been on beta interferon (Rebif) for nearly two years now and in that time I haven’t had a relapse.

Or have I?

Beta interferon is supposed to reduce the likelihood of having a relapse and minimise the effects if you do get one. Back in January 2009, when I came off gabapentin, I experienced a temporary worsening of symptoms such as fatigue, pain, heavy legs and one instance of flashy lights in front of my eyes. Was it a minor relapse as the neurologist thought? Was it the side-effects of coming off the gabapentin? Or was it the underfoot rumbles of the MS volcano?

I don’t know. I suspect all three depending on when you ask me.

I have a similar thing going on at the moment. In addition to the usual symptoms, I have had a couple of weeks where I have had a worsening of pain in my arms especially, mild spasticity in my left arm and both feet, hands that feel as if they are gently transporting a cactus as opposed to the usual background tingle, heavy legs again, fatigue, mild vertigo, uncontrolled movements in my calf muscles and last night, definite phosphenes in my right field of vision as I moved my eyes around.

So is it the hot weather?

Is it the MS Monster rolling over in it’s sleep?

Or is it a mild relapse?

I’m not inclined to bother anybody about it until my next yearly meet up with the neuro. My neuro is “running late” this year, apparently. Running late in the sense of he can’t see me in June as would normally happen, but will be able to when his appointments begin again in August, and the 115 people in front of me in the queue have been seen first.

In the meantime, I have restarted taking the amitriptyline.

New weirdness

Starting at 1pm or thereabouts yesterday afternoon, my right leg went cold. The sort of cold you experience when you suck on a strong peppermint and then breath in really fast. My right leg went peppermint cold. Oh and it felt dripping wet as well.

Needless to say, in reality, it was warm and dry. No incontinence to worry about, thankfully.

I have had no let-up in feeling as far as I can tell, and no L’Hermitte’s sign indicating the unlikelihood of new lesions in the cervical spine. So what is it, then? And why so sudden and so strong?

I don’t think it is the start of a relapse as my right leg sometimes has a few issues with sensations anyway. Also, apart from a mild dizzy spell, I have had no other symptoms flaring up unexpectedly.

It hasn’t been constant, either. The sensation has just returned after two to three hours hiatus.

So just one of those weird things, I guess.

Doublevision

Wahay! I am off to see an orthoptist tomorrow to talk doublevision.

Doublevision and eye movement problems in general have been my one constant since I had my last major relapse in 2008. My MS history is littered with symptoms and side effects that have come and gone or have fluctuated with other external factors such as stress, medication, temperature, exercise or pure  bad luck. Doublevision has remained constant since the spring of 2008.

Just like the MS in general, it is a companion but not a friend. It is the doublevision that reminds me I have MS when the other symptoms are lying low for a bit. I also think I have the doublevision to thank for the diagnosis – if I didn’t have it in the first place, I may not have made the fateful GP appointment. I would have probably lived with the tingling fingers, the fatigue, the occasional vertigo, even the pain for a bit longer before seeking medical advice.

Doublevision affects me only when I look left. From a single image looking straight ahead, two side-by-side images appear the instant I start looking left and the displacement increases the further I go. When I first discovered I had it, I tested it every breakfast-time by gradually looking left at two chimneys on the next street. These chimneys would eventually match up becoming one chimney with two TV aerials. It never got any worse, it never got any better. One and a half years on, it is still the same.

People ask me how I manage to drive with it. The answer is, I close one eye when looking left. Simple as that.

I find that I am constantly screwing up one eye in everyday situations, though, or I would have difficulty recognising people in the distance, crossing the road, participating in meetings and so on.

When I go out for a drink (I honestly don’t drink very much), I makes me feel drunk/ill way before I should do.

It doesn’t normally bother me. It’s constancy means I have learned to live with it. But it does tire me out and this has an impact on my mood and fatigue levels.

There are two possible solutions. One is to wear an eye patch. The other one is to wear glasses with prism lenses. I have no idea what these spectacles look like, so I have the fear of becoming the kid with the sticking plaster holding together a pair of national health specs. But then again I don’t fancy becoming Long John Silver either, therefore I have the orthoptist appointment tomorrow. It has been a long time coming and should hopefully have a positive impact on my quality of life.

A further appointment with an opthalmologist is scheduled for later this month.

Experience of fatigue

Up to eighty-seven per cent of people with MS, including myself, experience fatigue at some point. It is important to us that people don’t think fatigue is the same as tiredness. It is the most draining experience imaginable and it can happen for no apparent reason.

I went to a talk by an occupational therapist the other night on fatigue and it’s management. As part of his presentation, he included quotes from some of the people with MS he has consulted with over the years.

I thought it would be useful to re-quote them here as I am sure these statements will resonate with the fatigued among us and go some way to help explain what it is like for others:

“Fatigue can literally reduce me to tears, for no reason, I just find I’m crying – it’s like the plug has been pulled out and my energy, almost my life feels like it is going down the drain…”

“I feel like I’m in a jail cell as I’m so tired all the time…”

“It feels as though my legs are full of lead, it’s literally like wading through treacle trying to do things…”

“It hits me like a wall and then I can’t do anything… There’s no real warning to it happening. Sometimes I’m not even sure if I’m awake.” (Oh boy, yes!)

“It’s hard to describe to someone that you’re feeling fatigued and tired when you’ve not actually done anything. I used to be so active.”

Prior to my diagnosis, when I was going through the darkest hours of a relapse, I had a number of afternoons at work where I had what can be best described as a waking sleep at my desk. It was deeply worrying to say the least and I remember the thought “What’s happening to me?” playing on a loop in my head.

Perhaps the hardest thing about fatigue is that it is invisible to everyone else. I’m not being lazy or unhelpful and I can still do everything I could do before, it is just that sometimes I can find everyday tasks exhausting.

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