The Beta Interferon blues.

I’m about to go back on Rebif after a four week trial period of coming off it.

It wouldn’t be the first time I’ve done this, I tend not to take it on holiday (just a hassle) or over Christmas (to give myself a break).

So, have I noticed any changes?

On the negative side, I’ve noticed some extra dizziness and tingling arms and hands. A couple of days ago I woke up with a partially numb right forearm extending into my little finger, which isn’t usual for me.

And that’s it!

Of course I realise that a prolonged period off the meds increases the chance of a relapse etc, so I’m going to start injecting again tonight to see what happens next.

On the positive side (and this is a big one) I’m happier.

Granted, I’ve been on holiday to Florida over the last four weeks which might explain my improved Disneyfied mood, but I haven’t had the usual back to work blues this time.

I can quantify the improved mood as well.

A couple of months before I came off Rebif, my GP asked how I was feeling and handed me a mood questionnaire. The same questionnaire is available on the NHS website. I scored pretty highly: 15 out of 20, I think, which puts me bubbling under ‘severely depressed.’

If I complete the questionnaire now, I score 3 or 4, and I get those for MS related things rather than anything mood related. I might get up a lot in the night, for instance, because of my bladder.

Because my mood has improved, I’ve been eating less and been more energetic. I’m also sleeping better. My wife jokes that she doesn’t know many people who can go on holiday to the States and lose ten pounds, but I did. Ten pounds!! In two weeks!

Among the listed side effects of beta interferon 1a (Rebif and Avonex) is suicidal thoughts and depression, so it will be interesting to see what happens when I resume the meds. I’ll be monitoring my mood score and contacting my MS nurse if my situation changes.

The medication choices have changed in the six years since I was diagnosed, so if the worst comes to the worst I’ll have some research to do.

Anyway, wish me luck. Time to get those syringes ready.

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Making lemonade #2

Way back when I started secondary school, a rumour went around that all the boys would need a medical during the first term. This would involve a procedure where a nurse would hold our testicles while we coughed.

This never happened, of course, but a part of me believed it. It made the eleven year old me unduly anxious to say the least.

I often think about how cool it would be to be some sort of guardian angel to my awkward, shy, younger self. I’d put a supportive arm around my own shoulders and whisper something into my ear… some mature advice to make me feel better: “That thing about a nurse holding your bollocks? It won’t happen. It’s utter nonsense… ha ha! Just you wait another 30 years.”

Fast forward to the other week…

I’ve learnt a new skill!

It involves passing a foot long length of tubing into the most sensitive and private part of my anatomy.

The first time I did it, I had my trousers round my ankles, while a nurse (female), who I’d met for the first time barely 20 minutes previously, looked on, rubbing my shoulder in a supportive, encouraging manner.

Yes, I have to catheterise myself at least twice a day, now, due to the fact that I retain approximately one pint (500ml) of urine in my bladder, even after visiting the loo. The urology nurse who came to visit told me that anyone who regularly holds 400ml of urine is advised to catheterise (the MS Trust say anyone holding more than 100ml), so I fall (un)comfortably into that bracket.

I’ll be performing this procedure for approximately… hmmm… how many months? Oh wait!… The rest of my bloody life!

I’ll be honest with you. The first few days you try it, it isn’t easy to do. I winced each time at the prospect of threading the tube into such a seemingly tight space. I also had to change the type of catheters I was using as the initial bendy latex ones were causing too much pain and I was finding blood in my urine. Plus I found them as easy to hold as a live eel. But two weeks on, with stiffer, differently lubricated catheters, it’s a lot better, and I feel a lot calmer doing it.

So has it worked? Do I visit the loo less urgently? Do I go less often? Do I finally have an unbroken night’s sleep?

The answer to that is yes and no.

I can’t describe how crestfallen I felt on the first night. After painfully tubing myself before going to bed, I woke up at 2am, 4am, and then 6am desperate for the loo. It was as if nothing had changed. Nothing except for the fact that I now had to perform some sort of low level surgery on myself.

After a few nights of this, a phonecall to my MS nurse and a visit to the GP meant that I’ve started taking solifenacin tablets to relax the bladder muscle and reduce the urge to pass water.

It’s early days still, but I mostly wake up with my bladder just once a night now (and I catheterise when I do). During the working day I might make a trip to the loo, two or even three times in my six hour shift, instead of three times an hour, so to me, it’s an unbelievable turnaround. In the daytime I couldn’t be happier. I’m getting to be friends with my bladder again and it turns out he’s quite a nice guy.

There’s still the element of waking halfway through the night to contend with, though. I wonder if part of it is to do with learned behaviour. Perhaps my body automatically wakes up at regular points during the night and now needs to be retrained. I’ve tried to combat the night time loo visits by cutting down massively on the amount of caffeine I take in and the drink of water I have with my evening meal is often the last liquid to pass my lips every day.

It’s early days on the pills, though. Tomorrow marks one week of taking them and the GP told me it takes about seven days for them to kick in (the MS Trust says up to four weeks), so we’ll see how it goes. I don’t remember the last time I managed to sleep through the night without waking. The day I finally do, I’ll be partying.

Making lemonade

“To make lemonade out of the lemons life throws at you, you sometimes have to strangle kittens.”

Somebody tweeted that recently. Oh wait!… It was me! I tweeted it!

Why?

Because to aid a restful night’s sleep and to stop myself getting urinary infections, I will now have to self-catheterise every day, at least once a day, for the rest of my life.

Hooray! MS rarely gets sexier than that, eh?

Oh well, something else to put on my health CV.

So what’s happening?

I went to the hospital for my yearly check-up this week. I had to have a bladder scan after my usual neurologist appointment. Despite this, I needed a wee really badly when I finally got to the clinic and I used the loo before I’d even checked in at the desk. I’m sure you won’t mind me saying – it was a nice big wee.

45 minutes of waiting room passed as all sorts of MS patients came and went. Some who looked fitter and healthier than me to those in wheelchairs. MS waiting rooms are funny places. I always sit at the back, so I can look out over the city (the clinic is on the 11th storey of a hospital on top of a
hill). I always feel like I’m being weighed up by the other patients when my name is called and the very slight limp I have and the clumsiness I feel as I circumnavigate all the chairs seems amplified all of a sudden).

After my usual questions with the neurologist I got to see one of the MS nurses. Not my usual one.

He scanned my bladder – I had about 640ml of urine in it. I was just about ready for another wee, so he gave me a bed pan and off I went to the loo again. Again, it felt like a nice satisfyingly big wee. As it trickled to a stop I had a slight residual feeling there was more there but the feeling passed and I couldn’t go any more.

The reveal moment came when he told me that I’d managed to pass 120ml of that original 640ml and sure enough the follow up scan revealed that I had about 500ml of wee still inside me. To put it in context, a bladder can hold up to 1.5 litres, so that pint of wee I’m carrying around everywhere is about a third of a bladderful.

I think I can say I was mildly shocked.

Anyway, treatment options were discussed and we both decided that self catheterisation was the way forward. This will involve passing a thin lubricated tube, about a foot long into my bladder every day, once or twice (or more) a day.

It sounds potentially painful, but to his eternal credit he intimated that he’d tried catheterising himself to see how it felt. Just so that he could talk honestly about it to his patients. I felt completely reassured about it and I’m sort-of looking forward to the nursing team who will visit me in the next
week or two to show me how it’s done.

Actually, I’m not looking forward to it at all, but if it needs to be done, it needs to be done, and I’ll have a follow up appointment with the MS nurses in a month or two to see how I’m getting on.

A lot is said about specialist MS nurses and how great they are, but let me say this… I have received care from my MS nursing team for about five years now and going to see them is like going to see a good friend. Even though I’d only met this nurse for the first time, we had a long chat about music, bands we’re both into, cycling, drumming, vegetarianism, local neighbourhoods I wanted to explore after my visit and so on… He even made me a cup of tea. Despite the white coats and the technical equipment hanging from the walls, I completely forgot I was in a hospital.

I said as much on the online hospital feedback form the next day – credit where it’s due, and all that.

Travelling the ten or so miles into the big city and the usual pains of parking spaces, students and traffic congestion put aside – it’s always a pleasure to visit. Long may it continue to be so.

Three cheers for MS nurses!

Incidentally, I nearly chose “Taking the piss” as the title for this post, but felt that would have been unfair.

More soon…

PS – the shaking I experienced recently, didn’t tick the boxes of a fit, but may have been some residual dream-movement, like I thought.