Carbon brainprint

I’m quite happy with the fact that, as a family of four (six if you include Fluffles and Fudge our guinea pigs), we’re pretty good at recycling. Our youngest even has the job title of Recycling Officer to encourage her to weed out things that could be added to our recyclable waste.

On top of the fortnightly ‘black bin’ collection, there’s a fortnightly ‘blue bin’ collection for the usual recyclable materials and a ‘green bin’ collection for garden waste, which includes guinea pig bedding and poop.

I also have an allotment, so a lot of raw vegetable kitchen waste and cardboard gets added to a caddy and taken to the compost heap. I re-use our jam jars for my home made jams (rhubarb jam currently in production), before they’re added to the glass recycling.

Every regular black bin collection day, our landfill waste fills only about half a bin, which I think is not bad for a family of four (six).

It pains me, therefore, at the amount of waste having MS generates.

On the bladder front, I use approximately six catheters a day which come in individual hard-plastic screw-top sheaths. These need disposing of, and to do this I have some black granny-scented ‘nappy sacks’, there’s also associated wet wipes and hand gel. The only things I can recycle here are the info leaflets, the plastic bottles the hand gel comes in and the cardboard box that contains the catheters. Also the larger cardboard box and brown paper packing that the cardboard boxes are packed in when they’re delivered. The majority goes to landfill.

Medication-wise, I’m currently injecting Copaxone seven days a week. The syringes are supplied in plastic cases with peelable seals. The seal is somewhere halfway between plastic and paper and is (as far as I know) unrecyclable, so gets sent to landfill. The plastic cases are pretty much the same plastic that supermarkets use for fruit and the like, so they can go in the blue bin, as can the cardboard box the syringes get supplied in and the cardboard box the cardboard box comes in, when it’s dropped off at my GP surgery every month. Although, there’s that many luminous “chillcare” labels and cellophane invoice wrappers attached to this box, I’m unsure how much I’m contaminating the recycling with this when I dispose of it.

Of course, once I’ve done with them, the syringes are popped into a yellow, plastic sharps bin, that I drop off at the GP when it’s full and ask for them to dispose of as medical waste.

The company that supplies my Copaxone, rings me once a month to arrange delivery. Each time they ring I have to make a conscious effort to remember to ask them not to supply a new sharps bin as each one can last several months until full. If I don’t, they supply a new one by default.

Last month I forgot to ask and a new unnecessary one arrived. I’ve added this to what I consider to be my ‘accidental backlog’ because the GP surgery won’t take it and neither will the pharmacy over the road (I’ve asked) and I can’t contemplate chucking it in the bin.

So that’s sharps bins full of used syringes and approximately half a metric tonne of used catheter waste in bags and any other associated medication packs (inter-Botox solifenacin blister packs, for example) either going straight to an incinerator or landfill because of my MS.

So how is all this offset?

The only thing I can think of is that every now and then I work from home as a necessary adjustment, saving 20 miles worth of petrol each time, and the Botox injections have cut down the catheter waste and toilet flushes considerably. Other than that I’m struggling a bit, so I’ll just have to concede that these things are unavoidable and make a concerted effort to reduce waste further in every other aspect of life.

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