Baclofen fun

Well it’s the new year (happy new year!) and after over-indulging over the festive period, my thoughts have naturally turned to new year’s resolutions. Normally it’s something to do with losing a bit of weight and becoming fitter, even if it’s just a little bit fitter and being able to take my belt in a notch, or maybe even two notches if I’m lucky.

I’m not talking about joining a gym or going on a crash diet, because that’s just not me. It’s not something I can sustain or commit to. I know I can shed the pounds I need with a few sensible lifestyle changes. I’ve done it before, and that’s what I intend to do.

Also, the trouble is, I’ve come to the realisation that if I need to get fitter I need to build up some strength in my wobbly legs first.

There’s a brand new branch of the co-op just over half a mile from where I live. This has provided a good excuse to nip out for any supplies we might need. The co-op is about as far away as other local shops, but the walk involves a traverse of a local park so it’s much more pleasant and enticing than nipping to the local Spar or the Morrisons supermarket. If we run out of milk, or if I need some green pesto (co-op do a very good pesto), I treat it as an excuse to get some fresh air and a change of scene.

By the time I get home, though, I find it becomes a real effort to coordinate putting one foot in front of the other, my legs will be in the process of turning to jelly and I’ll clumsily fumble with my shoelaces like a crap Houdini once I’m through the door.

The truth is that I can barely walk a mile these days without the need of a ‘good sit down’ straight afterwards. This is a far cry from the five miles I used to run around the neighborhood until relatively recently, or the eight miles I used to walk every day while working in the east end of London some 15 years ago. When that mile is up, I’m already off balance; I feel like I’m leaning forward, waiting to collapse into the friendly welcoming arms of my sofa.

And it’s not just walking: I went to see one of my favourite bands – Mudhoney – in Leeds towards the end of last year and spent most of the gig worrying about my ability to stand up for long periods, only for someone else’s legs to give out in front of me.

So what’s the big difference between then and now?

Like any human being looking to lay the blame fairly and squarely at someone else’s doorstep, I’ve laid the blame at the doorstep of Baclofen.

Baclofen is a muscle relaxant that I take a couple of hours before bedtime to alleviate nighttime leg spasms. These spasms can literally kick me awake in the middle of the night and then repeat on a cycle every 20 to 30 seconds over a period of an hour or two. On the rare occasion they don’t kick me awake straight away, they’ll kick my wife awake who then obliges by throttling me into the world of consciousness.

Initially my dosage was a single 10mg tablet, but this stopped working as well as it had in the past and I upped the dose to 20mg towards the end of last summer. Over the last month or so I’ve noticed that the 20mg dose had stopped working as effectively, and now, when I wake up in the middle of the night for whatever reason (and I wake up every night), I know I’ll get a spasm by the time I count to 20.

I rang the MS nurses for advice. Should I seek an alternative drug? One that will not only prevent the spasms but also not cause the muscle weakness during the day?

Well, the short answer to that question is ‘no’. I seem to be prone to side effects, and they all have their side effects.

Twenty milligrams is also still quite a low dose and I can apparently increase this to 80mg if I need to. The leg spasms could also be kicked off by factors other than the medication losing its efficacy, or disease progression (my other worry).

Questions that the MS nurse batted my way included whether I’d had any infections… None that I knew of, although, being a catheter user, I could have had a mild infection without being aware of it. Also, I’d come down with a heavy cold in the previous 48 hours.

Also, have I had any major stresses? As I can confirm from my relapse history, stress can apparently influence MS as strongly as any infection.

Apart from my dad dying a month ago, his funeral occuring a couple of days previously and Christmas in the intervening period, I had no stresses that I could recall at all. Maybe the normal day to day stresses of being a parent to one teenager and one nearly-teenager, and being married to someone who takes a not unreasonable dislike to being kicked awake at 2am, but hey!… apart from all that, life is generally sweet.

The upshot is, I’m increasing my dose to 25mg until life gets a bit more tranquil. I’m starting to introduce more gentle exercise in my daily routine and I’m keeping a close eye on any changes for better or worse. Hopefully, when things are a little more settled, I can reduce the dose down again.

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Getting fit with Mr Uhthoff

This isn’t a new year’s resolution, but I have decided to get fit.

This incorporates a couple of in-built problems, the most obvious being the MS, of course, but the second being the fact that I don’t do personal trainers (I have to admit to being quite rude to the only one I have ever had) and I don’t do gyms.

Therefore I have been taking to the roads for the occasional run in the hours of darkness.

Regular readers will know that I had a spate of evening runs last year up on the nearby moors, but this time it’s serious.

Why? Because it’s winter and I can push myself a bit further each time without overheating and I’m slightly less ill than I was last year, so the repercussions of Uhthoff’s phenomenon aren’t as great. Also, because it’s dark I can run incognito (it takes a while before I get over my self-consciousness).

I have been out three times in just over a week and I have lost two pounds in weight. I want to lose about a stone overall. Plus, as you can see in my post “Giving in” I need to build up my stamina.

I am trying to build up to five mile runs with a few hills thrown in, so far I have progressed as far as a two and a half miler on the flat with a sprint for the last 100 metres or so.

I am comparing this year’s training to the last time I did some serious regular running three years ago. The 2007 fitness regime took place a year and a bit before I was officially diagnosed, so I have only realised in retrospect that the experiences I had then were due to MS.

Back in 2007 I experienced a numb leg and a rubbery burning smell afterwards which I whimsically attributed to having burnt-out some electrics in my head as I was running (not realising how close to the mark I was). I would also get oscillopsia on my longer runs.

The last fitness regime tailed off when my youngest was born. So far, as far as Uhthoff is concerned, I have been a little wobbly legged after each run, but this has diminished each time I have been out. I have also had ‘slow eyes’ for a while after I finish (so I am expecting some oscillopsia when the longer runs kick in). I still have the peculiar burning smell too.

I have been doing some reading up and now know the burning smell is phantosmia – an olfactory hallucination – and is quite common for people with epilepsy as part of the pre-fit aura or with people who have brain injuries in the part of the brain that interprets smell. I guess I must have demyelination here.

My ideal, is that one day (this year or next) I may (NB: may) do a 10k run in aid of one of the UK MS charities.

My current thinking is that I will be supporting the MS Trust for the support they showed me in terms of the excellent free information they sent to me when I was diagnosed.

With this in mind, I have been consulting the MS Trust’s superb online training information. It is well worth checking out even if you don’t have MS as they include clearly written information and training schedules for beginners as well as more experienced runners.

I’ll keep you posted on how I get on.

a little bit further along that long road to fitness

Managed two miles tonight in my secret moorland training camp. Yay! target reached.

Contended with failing light, with mist/drizzle (mizzle?) and a sharp headwind on the flat and downhill sections, but luckily behind me for the uphill. Oh! and an undone shoelace for much of the second mile

I think the “bad” weather helped. I have never been a hot weather type, but the drizzle was ice cold and kept me cool all the way round, so none of the usual crap apart from a few jumpy visuals after – also right eye wouldn’t look right for a while. I only had shorts and a T-shirt – no poncey jogging bottoms for me – no way!

Been a fairly busy day all round. Feeling good now – buzzing. Won’t be able to sleep easily. Shame because it’s one in the morning already.

Hopefully three miles next time.

The long road to fitness

I went for a run this evening out on the moors. There’s a triangle of road that is exactly a mile round so it’s easy to assess how (un)fit I am.

I hit the MS wall at one mile. Uhthoff not far behind – my eyes starting to play tricks. I just couldn’t lift my feet at all.

Next time I go out, I will aim for two miles.

Two years ago, I was going out for two five mile runs every week, involving hill climbs, the lot. I also wondered why I couldn’t see properly as I was running or why my leg was going numb in the shower afterwards.

I feel surprisingly un-fatigued now and it’s quite late. Just sitting in my tingly cloud. Must try to go out again before my personal trainer comes on Thursday.